I was reminded of  Mother’s Day through Facebook when someone posted a “Happy Mothers’ Day” message.   I was a tad confused about the date, since I don’t remember registering March 21 as Mother’s day anywhere in my memory chip!   When I “googled” it, I understood that Mother’s Day is observed and celebrated on different dates in different countries!

Never mind,  my personal opinion on this is not to confine Mother’s Day to only one single day in a year, but to dedicate and celebrate Mothers’ Day,  throughout the year.  Because, Mothers are special.

Today, on this Mothers’ Day,  let me dedicate this blog post to my late mother (Mummy);  my Amma (my mother’s elder sister who brought me up with love and affection); to my mother-in-law (who takes care of me like her own son);  to Bindu (my wife; and mother of two children) ; and to all mothers I know and do not know.

My Mummy, Late P. Sarada Amma

My Amma, Smt. Padmavathi Amma

My Mother-in-law, Smt. Indira Panicker

My wife, Bindu with Govind & Gayathri 

On this context, it would be cruel and criminal, if I fail to mention about my loving mother-in-law, who, inspite of her illness,  took strain  to help me as a by-stander during my hospitalization, in June, 2007.   Those days have really taught me more and more about  a mother’s love, affection and caring.  Having said that, let me once again thank each and every one who prayed for my health, visited me in hospital, donated me ample courage and boosted my confidence.   I salute you, THANK YOU!

A True Story – in 20 points!

Annamma, an elderly mother, at last,  forced herself to come out of her shell and appear before a Human Rights’ Committee.  Since the below is not a story, but some facts, I would like to present it to you in  a different way, through some bulleted points:-

  1. Annamma was born to a well-to-do parents nearly sixty years back.
  2. Annamma was given proper education, eventhough she was not much interested in her studies.
  3. Having not much hopes on her academic career, her parents got her married to a similar well-to-do bridegroom.
  4. Annamma spent time on household chores and doing some kitchen-farming.
  5. Soon after, the happy-go-lucky couple were blessed with a baby boy,  Chacko.
  6. Chacko was given extra care, love and affection by both his parents.
  7. When Chacko was eight, Annamma lost her husband, due to some illness.
  8. Annamma struggled to bring up her son.  She did household work for other people for her livelihood.
  9. In no time, Annamma, the once-rich-lady became a servant to many!
  10. But, she did not compromise on Chacko’s schooling. She worked more harder to pay her son’s school fees on time.
  11. Chacko studied well, passed out from his school, got admission in a reputed college and cleared his graduation with   good marks.
  12. Chacko got a decent job, through recommendation by one of Annamma’s masters, where she did household work.
  13. Chacko, an employee then, due to his prestige issues told Annamma to stop working for others as maid servant.
  14. Sitting idle at home made Annama a sick lady.
  15. She got much worried on her health and hastily did the partition-deed, transferring all her wealth (including land, cash etc.) to her only son.
  16. Within a couple of years, Chacko married Mary, daughter of a local businessman.
  17. Immediately, the very next day, Chacko,  under the influence of Mary and her father, started arguments with Annamma regarding the house and the land they had.
  18. Chacko insisted Annamma to vacate the house as the house legally belonged to him!!  Annamma could not believe what was happening to her.
  19. On the fourth day of his marriage, Chacko who came home fully drunk, started to beat up his mother, after  arguing on the house and ‘his’ land.  In no time, he kicked her, breaking her leg! THANK YOU, DEAR SON !
  20. With no hopes left, Annamma left “her home” empty-handed and and took refuge in an empty cowshed near her house.

On this Mothers’ Day, let us stand united to support and return the due love to our Mothers.  Let us dedicate a special day of ours (our birthdays, children’s birthdays, wedding anniversaries, parents’ birthdays) with these less-fortunate mothers.

Thankfully,  I could really celebrate my father’s birthday with some mothers in September 2005 – a celebration which I will never forget.

On this wonderful Mother’s Day, myself on behalf of my family members salute and respect  all the Mothers!

Amma, this flying kiss is for you.

With lots of  love,

Renjith,  your son.

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